The Truth About the Harry Quebert Affair.

The Truth About the Harry Quebert Affair.

In this gripping 10-part series, based on Joël Dicker’s novel of the same name, McDreamy becomes McDecitful as viewers try to work out whether Harry (Patrick Dempsey) is responsible for 15-year-old Nola Kellergan’s (Kristine Froseth) murder.

From the onset, the series has all of the ingredients of a binge-worthy boxset: it is centred around an unsolved, decade-old murder involving a literary icon (Dempsey) and his prodigy, Marcus Goldman (Ben Schnetzer.) 

Nola’s body is found.
100 meters from Harry’s secluded house, buried with his book.

Marcus is a successful novelist, trying to write a follow up to his breakout bestseller. Understandably, he turns to his mentor Harry for advice. However, when Marcus arrives in Maine to visit, a can, or rather a box, of worms open as he finds mementoes from Harry and Nola's relationship. 

Tension builds when the next day Nola’s body is found. 100 meters from Harry’s secluded house, buried with his book. And the only known witness was murdered along with Nola. Intriguing right? 

Though the murder happened decades ago, the drama is palpably real and Schnetzer’s portrayal of Marcus is brilliantly authentic. He is convincing as a self-conscious, newly famous writer; Marcus' determination to prove Harry’s innocence is matched only by the doubt surrounding his mentor's past. 

As an audience we are immediately drawn to the successful, troubled artists; though this sounds clichéd, Dempsey and Schnetzer’s portrayal of this archetype is thoroughly entertaining. In early scenes, Harry's calmness shows his wisdom and seniority. However, his collected nature becomes incriminating when his past relationship is called into question, his cool exterior causing us to reconsider his innocence. 

Regardless of whether Harry is innocent of murder, his relationship with Nola is unsavoury and criminal itself. Dempsey effortlessly treads the line between innocent infatuation and predatory behaviour, clouding our judgement. Alongside this, Froseth’s portrayal of Nola is subtle and captures the character’s elusive, charming demeanour- even if we only see her in flashbacks. 

Clearly, the series has potential, though it's not clear what the plot would be for a follow-up season. 

The Truth About the Harry Quebert Affair can be caught on Tuesdays at 9 pm on Sky Witness.

 

[Photo Credits: Georges Biard CC BY-SA 3.0]

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