Government Launches Project to Improve Children's Language and Literacy Skills

Government Launches Project to Improve Children's Language and Literacy Skills

The department of education has launched a project which will look to improve children’s early language and literacy skills as well as boosting parents’ confidence with home learning.

This project will seek to benefit disadvantaged families through extra support – nearly £18 million have been put aside for this project. This money will help to fund additional training for health visitors who work with families of young children to identify speech, language and communication needs early on – to have the most impact.

It will also fund educational games, apps and text message ‘tips’ for parents and careers from disadvantaged backgrounds which will help them interact with their children when at home or out – giving children opportunities to learn every chance they have. 

The Education Secretary is hosting a summit with nearly 100 companies, charities and public sector organisations so that every bit of help is given to parents with learning at home. Organisations like the National Literacy Trust, the National Children’s Bureau and the Scouts will get a portion of the funding to increase parents’ confidence with learning at home. This is an important project since “Education begins long before children arrive in the classroom” and every child should be given the same opportunities from early on – despite coming from different social and economic backgrounds.  

As well as this initiative, other successful grants pronounced were: 

-   £6.5 million for projects focused on closing the disadvantage gap at age five and improving the early years' education of children 

-   £5 million for trials to be led by the Education Endowment Foundation in partnership with Shine the north of England that will research the best way to help parents in disadvantaged communities to start building their children’s skills at home

-   £1.8 million for a programme with Public Health England, including new speech, language and communication training for health visitors, delivered by the Institute of Health Visitors

-   £5 million for organisations to investigate what works through bespoke local projects focused on best practice in early language, literacy and maths.

 As Christine Lenehan, the Director Council for Disabled Children says, “Early years are a key point of learning and intervention for children with SEN. We know if we can get in early, we can make a lifetime of difference”. 

This project so far has been widely accepted and praised within the education sector as well as having a real impact on families. 

To read the full press release click here.

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