Gender Stereotyping to be banned in UK advertising

Gender Stereotyping to be banned in UK advertising

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The U.K advertising watchdog (ASA) will ban adverts that reinforce gender stereotypes, with new roles coming into effect from June 2019.

The Committee of advertising practice collected evidence and published a report last year that unsurprisingly highlighted the extent to which gender stereotypes affect individuals on a daily basis. Ella Simillie, the Gender Project Lead said in a statement:

“The evidence we published last year showed that harmful gender stereotypes in ads contribute to how people see themselves and their role in society. That can hold some people back from fulfilling their potential, or from aspiring to certain jobs and industries, bringing costs for individuals and the economy. We’ve spent time consulting on new standards to make sure they target specifically those images and portrayals we found cause harm.”

Most of us have seen the infamous protein world adverts, asking women if their ‘beach body ready’ but here are some of the taglines from other explicitly misogynist adverts:

WeSwap

“We can’t swap your missus for a Swedish supermodel, but we can swap your money for her krona.”

I Am The Agent

“I am Dave, a soldier from Manchester…I am in control, I am saving, I am the agent”.

Uspaah

“Out with the guys till 4 am again?! Keep her sweet with a spa mani/pedi at home”.

The above taglines are just a few of the overtly sexist advertisements. But, there are a large number of ads across the UK that subtly embed gender stereotypes, from domestic cleaning products aimed at women to car advertisements targetting men, there are too many to list.

However, if there is a particular advert that you feel embodies dichotomous gender stereotypes, do get in touch!

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